lalumena

An Improbable Fiction

flawlessindie:

Belle (2013) dir. Amma Asante

I don’t think you guys know just how powerful this scene was. Literally when I was in the audience I could just see a lot of the women of color affected by this scene. A lot of us have gone through this self denial and self hate through the effects of white beauty standards and beliefs forced down our throats.This was the first time I had ever seen something that I had personally felt before portrayed on the screen and it put tears in my eyes.  If you haven’t seen this movie, go see it. It’s out on dvd/bluray/streaming

(via alexanderhamiltonisthebottom)

#LIKE THE WHOLE TIME SHE WARNED AGAINST MARRYING FOR LOVE BECAUSE YOU’LL END UP POOR OR BROKEN HEARTED #AND LIKE ANY WOMEN (BLACK WOMAN ESPECIALLY) SHE THOUGHT IT WAS JUST SOME FANTASY #BUT SHE FOUND A PERSON WHO BOTH RESPECTS HER AND HER VOICE AND WHO RECIPROCATES THAT LOVE #AWWWW BBY

(via alexanderhamiltonisthebottom)

"My greatest misfortune would be to marry into a family who would carry me as their shame as I have been required to carry my own mother. Her apparent crime to be born negro and mine to be the evidence. Since I wish to deny her no more than I wish to deny myself you will pardon me for wanting a husband who feels ‘forgiveness’ of my bloodline is both unnecessary and without grace."

(via ladymargaerytyrell)

micaelaqueen15:

13 Indie Films of 2013 to watch: Wadjda

You think you can act like a boy? If your father knew he’d kill you.

devilthrones:

"For one thing, there’s Dido’ fetishization by the two Ashford brothers. While one brother sees her simply as an exotic "other" whom he can bed without forming attachments — very different from the attitude toward white women of the same time period, whose virtue was unequivocal and untouchable — the other is downright violent in his conception of Dido, calling her "repulsive" but still expressing a desire to rape her. The scenes in which that older, more violent Ashford brother addresses Dido directly, giving voice to his unbridled racism and at one point assaulting her, are indisputably disturbing, not just because they represent a disgusting and brutal history but because I see remnants of those attitudes today in the way the world perceives the bodies of black and brown women: exotic, sexual, sensual, different objects. We see it in the way Miley Cyrus and almost any given white pop star (Justin Timberlake and Robin Thicke, for example) use black women’s bodies as props in music videos: as something to be appropriated and used for one’s own pleasure and then cast off in pursuit of the next trend. In addition, the rape of black women still does not seem to carry much horror in 2014; it was most recently a punchline on Saturday Night Live, and last year Russell Simmons was forced to apologize for his highly offensive "Harriet Tubman Sex Tape." None of this is too different from the way the Ashford brothers perceive Dido’s body: as an exotic "other" not worthy of love or respect but merely of lust, and lust framed in a particularly problematic racism."

 Belle: A Lesson in the Timelessness of Racism and Misogyny Against Black Women by Olivia Cole 

Helen Keller meeting comedian Charlie Chaplin in 1918 (from here).

hockpock:

qualiachameleon:

rocketumbl:

Theo Jansen  Strandbeest

Side note: These don’t have motors. They’re completely momentum/wind-powered and literally just wander around beaches unsupervised like giant abstract monsters.

these are both amazing and COMPLETELY TERRIFYING

AGREEEEEEED. I have fallen slightly in love.

(via tijsmans)